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20121126
20121126
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
party pass on a pledge, the vow never to raise taxes no how, no way, and today a way for a growing number of republicans to say, sorry, grover, it is over. that pledge we signed turns out it wasn't written in permanent ink. welcome, everyone, i am neil cavuto and don't look now but i think americans for americans for tax reform and the zealot could be pumped. grover norquist himself on what appears to be a revolt on the right, half dozen republican senators would have disown add pledge that isn't feasible now including oklahoma senator coburn, arizona's john mccain, south carolina's graham, idaho's crapo, tennessee's alexander, and georgia's sam bliss. it is not that they have all become antipledge, more like, well, antisweeping pledge. particularly the party of that pledge that called for resisting any move to end any tax break. to hear georgia's chambliss, too rigid, too inflexible, noting times have changed significantly, and i care more about my country than i do about a to-year-old pledge. if so, so what now? norquist in a second, to bob on republicans increasingly happy to ma
, clinton, and the first george bush, moved away from a position no additional taxes. they all added revenues to deficit reduction. a significant amount of revenue. >> your colleague from georgia just this week said the following about that pledge not to raise any taxes. >> you know, that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly.Ñi and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> it is my view that the issue of taxes is the number one stumbling block to any kind of fiscal deal. that has to be resolved first before you can get to issues like sequestration. when you hear that from a colleague, does it say to you that there is room, and does the president do anything short of raising tax rates on the wealthy? is there anything short of that acceptable? >> well, you've got to raise additional revenues, including tax rates on the wealthy. >> those have to go up? >> they have to go up. there's ways of doing that. secondly, though, we've got to close some significant loopholes. for instance, the ones which
, a new report out today showing how tax hike fears could impact consumer spending during the all-important holiday shopping season. part 2, the president's plans to take the issue straight to the voters and campaign style appearances and the use of an army of campaign volunteers to sell his message on tax hikes. the hope, that the coalition that put president obama back in office will help him ramp up the pressure on congress to make a deal. joining me now, chris van hollen and also a member of the house budget committee, congressman, good morning to you, sir. >> good morning, craig. great to be with you. >> the national journal reporting that the president could hold events related to the cliff this week. what are you hearing? >> well, i think that's right. i don't think anything has been settled. there have been on going conversations, but obviously the discussion will heat up this week now that the thanksgiving is behind us. >> what does the white house hope to accomplish with these types of events? >> well, look, this was not a side issue in the campaign. throughout the last
-- host: welcome to "washington journal." of the senate host: an increase in payroll taxes and the scheduled spending cuts across the board. a couple republicans yesterday signaled they could be flexible on the anti-tax pledge that they signed if it gets them closer to a deal with the white house. what is your reaction? here are the numbers to call. you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join us on facebook. you can also e-mail us. here's "usa today" looking at what happened on the sunday talk shows. it says -- the south carolina senator became the second republican senator in recent days to back away from a no tax pledge devised in the decades ago. the willingness to break ranks could prove crucial as gop leaders and democrats try to reach a deal before taxing and spending changes take effect in january. new york representative king says economic conditions have changed since the anti-tax pledge first emerged. he's a republican. that thee gop's say fiscal cliff deal is what defined grover norquist. let's hear congressman pete king of new york, a republican. he was
bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly. and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> on sunday south carolina senator lindsey graham also broke ranks saying the norquist pledge can no longer be a conservative litmus test. >> when you're $16 trillion in it debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece. but i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if it democrats will do entitlement reform. >> b
sure raising taxes on the wealthy is part of the deal. politico is calling them cliff jumpers. l good morning to both of you. >> good morning. >> let me play a couple of clips to start out about the pledge. >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you sign 20 years ago, 18 years ago, is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1841 i would have supported declaration of war against japan. i won't attack japan today. the world changed and the economic situation is different. >> i am not oblg gate on the pledge. i was just elected. the only thing i am honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i am sworn in in january. >> chambliss already made a similar statement last week. the question is is this a real softening of positions? does it give them room to make deal. >> two things. first, let's look at the real room being created. so far i haven't heard anyone say i am willing to raise marginal tax rates as part of a deal. they're arguing with the head of the antitax coalition about whet
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)